E-Scooters are becoming increasing popular to get around on, and are being advertised by companies who don’t advise buyers of the pitfalls of buying them.

Currently E-scooters can only be used on private property, unless they are a rental scooter which would mean following strict procedures. There are more and more sites in the UK currently offering rental scooters and there are trials ongoing in a number of UK cities.  Trials are currently being run in Essex and London, but only offer E-scooters to those over 18 years of age.

Using an E-scooter on a public highway which includes the pavement is illegal and means that you could face penalty points on your driving licence for no insurance and a heavy fine.  If you do not have a driving licence then you could also face prosecution for driving otherwise in accordance with a licence. The police can also seize your E-Scooter.

As with any motor vehicle you are not allowed to ride or drive this on a pavement, footpath, in a park and in many open spaces. E-scooters currently are not adapted for road use and therefore must not be used on any public road.

If you have consumed alcohol before or whilst driving or drugs, you could also be prosecuted for drink or drug driving. You could also be prosecuted for speeding, careless and inconsiderate driving and other traffic related offences. Until the Government legislation is changed you should not drive these on a public road or pavement. These penalties can have an enormous effect on your driving licence and future.

All electric scooters are classed as a motor vehicle under the Road Traffic Act.  E-scooters are classed as powered vehicles and as such fall under the term “mechanically propelled vehicle.”

Whilst there are a number of trial sites there are regulations that still need to be complied with. In order to drive an E-scooter you must have the category Q entitlement on your driving licence.  A full or provisional UK licence for categories A M A or B includes entitlement to category 2.  If you have one of these licences you can use an E-scooter.

If you have a provisional licence you do not need to show L plates when using an Escooter.  If you have an overseas driving licence you can use an E-scooter if:

  1. You have a valid full licence from an EU or European Economic area county as long as this does not prohibit you from driving low speed mopeds and motor cycles
  2. You have a valid full licence from another county that entitles you to drive a small vehicle for examples cars, mopeds, or motor cycles and you entered the UK within the last 12 months.

If you have been resident in the UK for more than 12 months you must exchange your licence if you wish to continue to drive in the UK.

You cannot use an E-scooter if you have an overseas provisional licence, learner permit or equivalent. The maximum speed for an E-scooter is 15.5 MPH.  You can only use an E=scooter on private land or if you are part of a trial.  Trial E-scooters are limited to this speed and in some areas E-scooters may be limited to a lower maximum speed.

E-scooters must have motor insurance but this is something you would have to arrange with the provider of the E-scooter Rental Operator.

In relation to trialing these scooters they these can be driven on the road except a motorway and in a cycle lane.  They cannot be used on the pavement.

Escooters do not need to be registered or display registration plates or pay vehicle excise duty.

Please be aware of the requirements of owning a E-Scooter otherwise you may find it is a costly buy that you cannot use unless it is on private property.

If you have any questions in relation to this or any other Road traffic enquiries please do not hesitate to contact us on  01702 662963 / 020 35537115/  01277 889193 /  01268 855679or send us a message using the contact button below.


This article does not necessarily deal with every important topic or cover every aspect of the topics with which it deals. It is not designed to provide legal or other advice. If you require specialist advice on this topic, please contact us to discuss how we may assist you.

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